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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
questions from members of the house of commons. after that, a look at the status of the fiscal cliff negotiations between congress and the white house. then a discussion on the role of lobbyists in those talks on the fiscal cliff
that possibly as part of the fiscal cliff negotiations. caller: right. it will cost them in the long run. host: because the money is coming out of social security. politicians say that will not happen. they say social security will have its money. caller: they tell you all kinds of things. host: john in atlanta, democratic caller. caller: how are you? it seems like it is open phones. i think as far as the fiscal cliff is concerned, the democrats and republicans need to come together and they need to do that rather quickly, because that's the way i feel about it. host: do you think it decides it should just agree to pass the tax cuts -- extend the tax cuts for middle-class americans and then wait until later to resume the debate over spending and tax cuts for wealthy americans? caller: they should start with that. and if they agree on that, then they can go on to the next thing. but this lagging and dragging along on both sides makes no sense. host: here is the washington post this morning. [video clip] >> i don't think the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now t
talked about where things stand in the fiscal cliff negotiations and responded to house speaker boehner's criticism of president obama on the issue. we'll show you as much of this as we can until the house gavels back in at 5:00 eastern. >> good afternoon. welcome to the white house. thanks for being here. i have no announcements to make at the top so i will go straight to your questionless. mr. henry's disappointed that i have not a single announcement. jim. >> thanks, jay. the speaker, as you know, spoke today and turned the conversation over to the spending cuts and the fiscal cliff negotiations. two questions on that. one is, does that suggest that there is movement, so we're no longer talking about tax cuts or tax increases? and where is the administration, i know you guys have argued back that they have provided details on spending cuts, but are you prepared to offer more? today you have a letter from c.b.o.'s urging that spending cuts, entitlement adjustments and so forth be a multiple, a greater multiple than revenues. is the white house prepared to do more on that front? >> let
to negotiate and create another fiscal cliff down the road. i hope we will not do that. i still think there is time before the end of the year to make that happen, but again, if it does not happen, unfortunately what that does is throw us into another debt ceiling situation, which is just not good for our country. we would be so much better off starting off on january 1 with this in the rearview mirror. our economy would take off and our country would be so much better off. >> chris, you understand the politics of the house from both sides. can john boehner cut a deal without eric cantor and paul ryan? >> i have a pretty good understanding of the house, but i always am a little afraid of wandering into house republican leadership politics. just to broaden the question a little bit -- i think the question is whether or not the speaker is going to be able to bring a good part of his caucus with him. that or require a united leadership team. >> i am talking short-term -- the next two or three weeks. >> i think that is going to be a requirement. i think one of the decisions the speaker wi
" on this wednesday, december 12, 2012. negotiations continue over the so-called looming fiscal cliff. yesterday president obama and john boehner spoke by phone. washington post reported however that they are still working on a deal and nothing is locked down yet. we will talk more about the fiscal cliff this morning on "the washington journal." what tax deductions would you give up as part of a solution to the deficit problems? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. find a son facebook and weigh in there. at journal@c- span.org. "the christian science monitor," asked what we would be willing to give up. "americans would be willing to give up the tax deduction for charitable giving over other popular tax breaks." host: let's take a look at the results of this poll. 25% said that they would be willing to give up the charitable giving tax deduction. almost the same amount said it would be willing to give up their deduction for state taxes. 19% said
the house republican conference spoke about the debt and deficit and the late etc. fiscal cliff negotiations. house speaker john boehner and the white house traded a second round of proposals yesterday on the budget cus that begin to take effect in january of 2013. this is nearly half an hour. >> good morning, everyone. i'm really proud to stand here today with the house republicans and my colleagues to tell a very important story and it's a story of hard working americans and their families. and let me tell you there's no story that is more powerful. the story of all americans, it's the story of moms an dads, husbands and wives, grandparents that work hard and sacrifice, so that they can leave a better america to their children and their grandchildren. and as the debate is looming over the fiscal cliff, we stand here to fight for those hard working americans and their families. because as the federal government grows larger and larger, the middle class is squeezed more and more. and as i -- i'm a mom. i have two kids. when my daughter was born two years ago, her share of the national debt w
looking for work. earlier today on capitol hill john boehner commented on the fiscal cliff negotiations with reporters. >> this isn't a progress report because there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and jobs the white house has wastde another week. secretary gitener came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on and had more stimulus spending thanned the in cuts. and an indefinite increase in the debt limit like for ever. now four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there has been no count offer from the white house. instead reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate stradgeji to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. w
speeches. see the senate live on c-span to. negotiations continue on the fiscal cliff. this morning, negotiations and how they were going. host: let's begin with what is business forward? guest: it is an organization with a very simple mission. our job is to try to make it easier for business leaders are around the country to speak out on issues of public policy. host: is this a brand-new organization? guest: we have been around for about three and a half years. our target market our business leaders around the country. we try to get them more involved in the policy-making process. we bring administration officials, members of congress out to cities across the country to do briefings with business leaders and then we bring those business leaders to washington to tell them how to grow jobs and how to recover. what do the business leaders say to the president? guest: we have brought 50 plus different groups to the white house to talk to the president's economic advisers. we have brought about 370 business leaders representing 32 different states. the message they are giving is pretty
here, forget fiscal cliff, forget negotiations. you just look economically, raise taxes, you don't get all the money you think you are going to bring in. >> brian: real quick, kevin mccarthy, one of the young guns, was on "metropolitan the press" and said, good news. revenues are up 10%. that's because we seem to be turning around economically. here is the bad news, spending is up 16%. why? he's trying to explain to a very reluctant david gregory, why should we consider raising tax when is clearly the revenue is up, but the spending is up higher? >> the president wants to raise tax rates on people making more than 250,000. he thinks that will bring in $82 billion in one year. the experience of california and other countries is that you will not bring in $82 billion. you bring in less. >> brian: sadly, it's just about getting a trophy and saying i told you i would do it. >> that's the politics of it. >> brian: varney and company might want to pick this up at 9:20 eastern time. >> always take your advice. >> brian: i'll put it in writing. >> thank you. >> brian: three minutes before the
that the negotiations to avert the fiscal cliff are successful, in my view we should not wait for a grand bargain in order to finish work on this important tax extender legislation. tax extenders are different from the other fiscal cliff issues for three basic reasons, and let me describe those reasons. first tax extenders are much less contentious than the other end of year problems that we -- that need to be resolved. the tax extender bill on the senate calendar has strong bipartisan support. in august, the finance committee approved it by a large margin. we have support from six republicans, including the ranking member, senator hatch. all 13 democrats supported it. i believe that many more republicans will vote for this legislation if it's brought up for consideration here in the senate. the bill consists entirely of tax cuts. it should not be difficult to get senators to vote for tax cuts, right before christmas especially. most of these tax cuts have solid bipartisan support. many of these tax cuts will help the economy, will help the middle class. for example, the bill includes the deducti
" continues. host: we have been breaking apart the fiscal cliff talks, looking a different policy aspects of the negotiations and today we focus on domestic spending. charles clark, senior correspondent with government executive me -- media group is here. sequestration, if it happens, we talk about automatic spending cuts, but what is sequestration? they usedthe 1980's, to talk about the vegomatic, a late-night advertisement that did the cutting for you. in 2011, congress had a super committee that was supposed to determine the cuts and they failed. the backup plan was something nobody wanted, but it was supposed to put fear into everyone, and that was across- the-board cuts of about $500 billion over 10 years. host: in domestic spending? guest: yes, and another $500 billion in national security- related spending. host: in 2013, we're talking about a total of $109 billion in cuts. discretionary spending makes up about $38 billion. non-defense mandatory makes up about $17 billion. can you explain the difference? guest: mandatory has to do with entitlement programs that beneficiaries are pe
cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit, but so he can spend to his heart's content. for months, the president has been saying that all he wanted to raise taxes on the top 2% so he can tackle the debt and the deficit. however, yesterday, he finally revealed that that is not really is true intent. by demanding the power to raise the debt limit whenever he wants, by as much as he wants, he showed what he is really after is assuming unprecede
and congress as we face the fiscal cliff. he said at one point that the president is calling for raising taxes $1.6 billion. that's true. but i would call to his attention the fact that the simpson-bowles commission suggested that 40% of the $4 trillion in deficit reduction come from revenue in taxes. what the president is suggesting is entirely consistent with that bipartisan group's call for more revenue in taxes as part of our deficit reduction. the president's made it clear, though, he wants to protect and insulate middle-income families from any income tax increases, and i agree with him. we should not raise the income taxes on those making less than $250,000 a year. i voted that way in july. we sent the bill to the house. it sits there. it languishes in the house because the speaker won't call it. he has his chance this week or the next to call that bill on the floor of the house of representatives to avoid any tax increase on middle-income families. that's an important thing for us to get done before we leave at the end of this particular session of congress. let me say that $1.6 trilli
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)